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New technology helps college student see clearly for the first time

Nick Flores says seeing is a gift. "It's like waking up and one day just being in a different world," Nick said. A simple walk through campus never looked so spectacular for this 23-year-old student. (CBS Austin)

Nick Flores says seeing is a gift.

"It's like waking up and one day just being in a different world," Nick said.

A simple walk through campus never looked so spectacular for this 23-year-old student.

"I'm very thankful," Nick said. "A lot of emotions going on inside and just being able to actually see the color and the detail. Small details of like the fountain, the leaves and the grass. I mean just the little things."

Nick is legally blind.

"I pretty much see the world kind of like in a blur," Nick said. "A little scary at times."

But, with cutting edge technology called eSight, faith and his best friend, Nick has a new outlook on life.

"eSight has just opened up a whole new world," Nick said.

Jack Bane is one of Nick's best friends and almost can't believe how eSight has changed Nick's life.

"I can't even explain it," Jack said. "It's just. It's crazy."

They randomly met one night on their way to bible study near campus.

"I really didn't know where to go," Jack said. "It was my first night going to that church."

Ironically, Nick, who is legally blind, showed Jack where to go. They've been fast friends ever since and when eSight invited Nick to test a set of new high tech glasses in Dallas Nick needed a ride.

"He said like, 'would you be willing to take me up there' and I said 'sure'," Jack said.

Nick was about to see clearly for the first time in his life.

"Nick was a little bit nervous at first I think," Jack said.

That nervousness turned to joy and an overwhelming emotion as Nick saw Jack's face clearly and in detail for the very first time.

"When I put the glasses on and I looked across the room he had this big smile on his face," Nick said.

Jack thinks Nick was stunned.

"He just sat here and just kinda stared at me for probably 10 seconds without saying anything," Jack said. "Just looking. I could tell it was kind of a shock for him to like actually see my face for the first time."

"That was um, incredible," Nick said with emotion. "I was like wow."

Jeffrey Fenton is eSight's director of outreach.

"It's been really special getting to know nick," Fenton said. "Everyone deserves to see."

He says, "Everyone deserves to see" is eSight's motto.

Fenton says the system works with a camera headset and a special prescription lens frame. The glasses clip on to the device. They are kind of like a super computer for the eyes.

The headset is connected to a controller and lets Nick zoom in and out and control contrast and color settings.

The video signal is then transmitted back to the headset and is displayed on LED screens in front of Nick's eyes.

Nick says you can call it fate or divine intervention. Nick says his faith in God tells him maybe that random meeting with Jack and his willingness to drive him to Dallas to meet with eSight was not so random after all. Maybe it was meant to be.

"It seemed like a coincidence but I really don't think it was a coincidence at all," Jack said. "I think God put us together for a reason. It was a miracle an absolute miracle."

Nick says he's been dreaming of this day since he was a kid and now his world is crystal clear.

If you would like to know more about eSight or help with the gift of sight, go to MakeBlindnessHistory.com.

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