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After Wilson arrest, questions over his gun rights if convicted

After Cody Wilson - the Austin man known for his 3-D printed ghost guns company - was arrested in Taiwan Friday morning after being charged in the United States with sexual assault of a minor, there are questions over his rights to his ghost guns. (CBS Austin)

After Cody Wilson - the Austin man known for his 3-D printed ghost guns company - was arrested in Taiwan Friday morning after being charged in the United States with sexual assault of a minor, there are questions over his rights to his ghost guns.

Wilson is facing a 2nd degree felony charge. Because of this, he cannot obtain new guns, but can keep what he already has.

Wilson, who has never shied away from expressing his thoughts on gun rights, would lose his if convicted down the road.

"If you get convicted of certain felonies, there is no restoration of gun rights," said Amber Vazquez, a lawyer.

But when talking about his 3-D printed guns, the picture is not so clear. Vazquez says this will be the first time these kinds of guns are brought into the equation when talking about gun rights for those charged or convicted with a felony. "This is just new territory with this kind of a weapon," she said.

Central Texas Gunworks owner Michael Cargill says 3-D printed guns will likely be considered a gun, which means Wilson won't be allowed to have them if he is convicted. "Even if it's a gun you build at home, a ghost gun, it doesn't matter. If you build that gun at home, you still cannot be in possession of it at all once you're convicted of a felony," Cargill said.

Under federal law, a firearm is defined as any weapon which can expel a projectile by the action of an explosive.

Vazquez says if 3-D printed fall under this definition, Wilson will not be allowed to even make a ghost gun. "He would have to create some sort of a separation between what he's producing, and what he actually has contact with," she said.

Going forward, Vazquez says we will learn more on how the court sees ghost guns. "I would assume it would be considered a regular firearm, but this has not been litigated in any court yet," she said.

Vazquez says Wilson can still own the software and 3-D printer that makes guns if he is convicted. He just would not be allowed to be in possession of the guns. She also says he could seek a deferred adjudication, which would give him an opportunity to restore his gun rights if he fulfills certain obligations.

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