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Parents looking to release date of TEA Corrective Action Plan

The Texas Education Agency - or TEA - is working on their Corrective Action Plan for special education, a little more than a month after an investigation found the state denied special education services to thousands of students for more than a decade. (File image)

The Texas Education Agency - or TEA - is working on their Corrective Action Plan for special education, a little more than a month after an investigation found the state denied special education services to thousands of students for more than a decade.

The public feedback period for the TEA's plan ended on Tuesday. They have posted their draft proposal on their website.

The TEA will have a final draft prepared by March 1st.

Lisa Flores is a parent of a child who utilizes special education, and she has participated in this phase of the process.

"Optimism with a healthy dose of watchdog," Flores said. "I want to see the bulk of funds go to school districts, because ultimately they are going to be the ones that are going to be providing those services to students."

This all started when the U.S. Department of Education found the state of Texas denied special education services to students by not having sufficient resources to identify students with disabilities, and quietly putting a cap on the percent of students able to enroll in special education.

During some of the parent feedback meetings, Flores says she heard some concerning messages from the TEA.

"He was not acknowledging there was an illegal cap at all, and he also said no adverse action was taken against any schools, which is blatantly false," Flores said. "The culture at tea needs to change."

Back when the investigation findings came to light, Governor Abbott told the TEA they must fix their issues. The TEA responded, saying they would.

Flores has gone over the draft of the TEA's plan.

The plan primarily involves increasing staffing.

"I'm excited about the proposition to monitor the 1,200 school districts we have to get surprise visits and make sure everything is in compliance," Flores said.

While there are some things to be hopeful for, Flores says she needs to see these changes first.

"We want our kids to be meaningfully educated. That hasn't been possible for a long time," Flores said.

The final corrective plan will be submitted to the U.S. Department of Education in April.

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