MENU
component-ddb-728x90-v1-01-desktop

Austin company sells bullet proof backpacks

Capture.JPG

As school officials look at different ways to keep students safe after the shooting in Santa Fe, an Austin company is selling bullet proof backpacks.

After multiple recent school shootings, parents are looking for anyway to keep their kids safe at school. For Austin business Ready to Go Survival, that’s pushed them to provide bullet proof backpacks.

“We felt the market ask for it,” Ready to Go Survival co-owner Roman Zrazhevskiy said.

Zrazhevskiy said they started selling them a year ago. He said parents have asked them specifically to keep their kids safe at school.

“People are just generally concerned I mean you hear about school shootings in almost every month now there’s something going on,” Zrazhevskiy said.

“Once we started getting these inquiries over and over and over we decided to create our own product,” he said.

Their bulletproof backpack is a pad that he says is level 3-A rated. It’s a pound and a half and can fit in most any backpack.

That means it can withstand up to a 44 magnum round. Zrazhevskiy said they did their own test and the backpack withstood up to 30 rounds from a 9 mm pistol.

“It worked flawlessly up to that capacity,” Zrazhevskiy said.

High powered rounds, like from rifles, do penetrate the pad and backpack. Zrazhevskiy said it does provide a level of insurance, but he also said it should be combined with training.

“Along with having a barrier to stop a bullet you’re going to need training as well because that’s really the thing that will be most helpful in an emergency situation,” Zrazhevskiy said.

AISD officials didn’t know of any rules banning bullet proof backpacks. Zrazhevskiy said a number of his clients do have their kids take them to school every day.

He also said more should be done to protect kids in school.

“A bulletproof backpack is just one piece of protection but there’s so many other things that we can do to kind of mitigate the risks and help children in case this happens again,” Zrazhevskiy said.

close video ad
Unmutetoggle ad audio on off

Trending